Concert review

Cambridge, Corn Exchange, 21 Jan 2007

21 Jan 2007
Daily Telegraph
David Cheal

Soaring on Solid Air

David Cheal reviews John Martyn at the Corn Exchange, Cambridge

On the sleeve of his classic 1973 album Solid Air, John Martyn looks young, fresh and alive, his skin cherub-smooth, his features sharp and defined.
Today, aged 58, the Anglo-Scottish singer, songwriter and guitarist is a big, big man, with a face ballooned and ravaged by time, and a body that's largely wheelchair-bound following the loss of his lower right leg through an infected cyst in 2003.

Cardiff, St David's Hall, 22 Jan 2007

23 Jan 2007
The Western Mail
Andrew Wilcox

St David's Hall, Cardiff

I suppose it may be difficult to support John Martyn. Yet somehow John Smith, tonight's supporting act, manages to cram references to Star Wars, Tim Buckley and the problems with registering your own name as a domain (http://acousticsmith.com/) into his set and pull it off with a great guitar style and a sweet deep voice that takes you back to the singer songwriters of the Seventies.

London, Barbican, 11 Sep 2006

13 Sep 2006
The Times
Pete Paphides

John Martyn

Thirty three years have elapsed since the Old Grey Whistle Test performance that conferred a measure of stardom on John Martyn. However, the image of the lithe, curly-haired troubadour singing May You Never seems lodged in the communal memory bank — three minutes of television that prompted thousands of aspiring guitarists to experiment with echo boxes and unbuttoned waistcoats.

London, Shepherd's Bush Empire, 10 May 2006

12 May 2006
The Guardian
Mat Snow

* * * * *

In the 1970s, John Martyn was the master of the romantic sublime. Schooled in the 1960s folk boom, this Glaswegian went electric, made the Echoplex tape-delay device his own, and found his musical soulmate in fellow closet jazznik double-bassist Danny Thompson. Tender intimacy and booming spaciousness all of a piece, Martyn's classic albums Bless The Weather, Solid Air and One World conjured acoustic-electric moodscapes where your heart and time itself stood still.

Glasgow, Royal Concert Hall, 10 May 2004

11 May 2004
The Scotsman
Fiona Shepherd
John Martyn * * *
ROYAL CONCERT HALL, GLASGOW

Bigger and gruffer than ever

JOHN Martyn, arguably Scotland's most respected singer-songwriter, has played the musical equivalent of steady darts throughout his career, while continuing to attract new fans to his understated brand of Celtic soul. Consequently, last night's audience represented a broad church, who were politely receptive to his support act, a mousey young minstrel called Eva Abraham, who has obviously heard a Joni Mitchell album or ten in her time.

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